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  • This Week In Tech Policy

    • Congressman Neguse Announces $2 Million National Science Foundation Grant to Support STEM Students at Front Range Community College and Colorado State University
    • Congressman Joe Neguse announced that the National Science Foundation (NSF)  has awarded a $2,741,708 grant to support STEM students at Front Range Community College and Colorado State University. Specifically, the grant will support the “Scholarships and Learning Community to Build Academic Momentum in STEM Students who Transfer from a Community College to a Four Year University,” a project which aims to increase the number of low-income, academically talented students from Front Range Community College who complete a STEM associate degree, transfer to Colorado State University, and complete a STEM baccalaureate degree.
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    • A proposed Denver law would ban police from using facial recognition technology
    • Connor Swatling doesn’t want Big Brother watching you. The Denver resident has introduced a ballot measure banning the Denver Police Department and every other city entity from using facial recognition technology for law enforcement purposes. DPD does not currently use the technology, department spokesperson Sonny Jackson said. He added that the department does not use local or national databases that use the tech. Denver Police does operate more than 250 “HALO” cameras, but Jackson said those don’t have facial recognition capabilities.
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    • Colorado Attorney General announces start of antitrust investigations into big tech companies including Google and Facebook.
    • Colorado's state attorney general Phil Weiser -- along with 50 other attorneys general nationwide -- recently announced the start of antitrust investigations into big tech companies including Google and Facebook. The attorneys general joined the investigation into Google and its advertising practices on Monday. They'll look into whether Google has taken part in unfair business practices that are unlawful and anti-competitive.
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    • Lyft exec: California bill would radically change ride-hailing
      Uber, Lyft and others are fighting hard against a California bill that would force them to classify drivers as full employees. In Lyft's case, if the bill becomes law as is, the company would have to shift to a smaller pool of full-time drivers, Lyft president John Zimmer said on Tuesday at the Deutsche Bank Technology Conference in Las Vegas.
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    • 2019 State of Computer Science Education Released 
    • Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance, a National Science Foundation Broadening Participation in Computing Alliance, released the 2019 State of Computer Science Education report. The report describes the policy trends and momentum over the past 12 months.
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